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Bluebell Bulbs

Useful Info And History For The Home Gardener



WETLAND PLANS

Plants which thrive in very moist or water saturated environments such as damp woodlands, marshland, river and stream banks as well as ponds have always been deemed splendid, allowing the adjoining and sometimes even merger of two of our planet’s most picturesque elements – water and vegetation. Many species of wetland plants, particularly mat-forming varieties, share the trait of a perfectly symmetric shape and of rounded, often shimmering foliage which is just as attractive as the bloom itself. Others, which produce spiking blooms of soothing colour tones, are usually impressive in height and gently rustle in the wind, creating a unique atmosphere.

In nature, they are implicitly found only in auspicious conditions, which must be provided for them when purposely established as landscaping features. Artificially created water features, for instance ponds, have long been associated with impressive architecture, outdoor art and why not, an aura of mystery, as they feature on many castle grounds and around aristocratic mansions. In or around pounds, purposely established wetland vegetation helps create a peaceful, almost otherworldly retreat which predisposes to nature contemplation.

Cuckoo FlowerCardamine pratensis – Llaeth y Gaseg

Origin: Britain

Flowering: March, May

Also popularly referred to as Ladies’ Smocks, this species seems very adaptable as it successfully establishes in a variety of environments, such as bogs and moist soil pastures, but also locations with a lower level of humidity. Over the ages it has been a source of artistic inspiration due to the gracefulness of its greyish pink flowers. It flowers in the middle of spring.

Kingcup Caltha palustris – Gold y Gors

Origin: Britain

Flowering: March, May

Obtaining a perfectly harmonious assortment of shapes and colours from the adjoining of its rounded shiny foliage and bright yellow blooms, this beautiful plant blooms earlier if not the earliest of all wetland plants. It’s ideal for planting near bodies of water such as ponds, lakes, rivers or streams, as well as bogs. Water abundance seems to be its main requirement, as, in terms of sunlight exposure, it is not very particular, plying itself to what its setting has to offer. It even grows in full shade, which is specific to a large number of plants in this category.

Water AvensGeum rivale – Mapgoll Glan y Dwr

Origin: Britain

Flowering: March, April, May, June

This spectacular plant blossoming all through the spring season boasts a striking contrast on its corolla, which is made up of a violet calyx and petals of an energising pinkish orange. One can rarely come across it in the wild anymore yet its typical environment is a shaded river bank, where it grows at will. Its deeply divided foliage is also distinctive.

White Water Avens - Geum rivale album

Origin: Britain

Flowering: March, April, May, June

The pure white variation of Geum rivale, it is located in the same type of environment and also blooms from March to June, making it a constant embellishing feature throughout the spring season. The colour of its leaves is slightly brighter as well.

Ragged RobinLychnis flos-cuculi – Carpiog y Gors

Origin: Britain

Flowering: May, June, July

Generating dainty pink flowers with deeply cut petals, its corolla only encompassing four, this is a very sturdy species as it grows in harsh climates, including the northernmost parts of Europe. It thrives in water-based environments such as marshes, yet at times develops in places with a medium level of humidity as well. It flowers late in the season, at the beginning of summer.

Purple LoosestrifeLythrum salicaria – Llys y Milwr

Origin: Britain

Flowering: June, July, August

A rather unusual marshland plant, this species also flowers during the summer season, producing surprisingly tall blooms in the forms of upright lavender spikes, up to three feet in height. It can grow ideally beside lakes, rivers or streams - and of course, in marshlands, its wonderfully tall blooms making it a key feature of its natural setting. In terms of light needs, it should be planted in full sun; however it does adapt to partial shade as well.

MeadowsweetFilipendula ulmaria – Bugeiles y Weirglodd

Origin: Britain

Flowering: June, July

With a preference for patches of soil which are drenched in water, but also for strong sunlight, this plant grows to an impressive height of three feet and is also known as Queen of the Meadow, presumably due to its imposing stature. Its foliage resembles fern fronds, whereas its blooms are made up of charming, warm cream petals. Its fragrance is another renowned trait, as it has long been used for scenting potpourri mixtures.

Bog VioletViola palustris – Fioled y Gors

Origin: Britain

Flowering: April, May, June, July

A shade loving plant, it grows optimally in swampy areas, unfolding from creeping tubers and flowering in mid season. Its foliage is rounded and its flowers a pale mauve.

Meadow RueThalictrum flavum – Arianllys

Origin: Eastern England

Flowering: June, July

Commonly adorning river and stream banks as well as damp meadows, this plant blooms during the summer season, when it generates multiple flowers per stem, of a lovely shade of beige. It can grow as tall as one metre. Unfortunately, our times have seen it decrease in numbers and the opportunity to observe it or photograph it in in the wild becomes evermore scarcer . Perhaps it is up to individual growers to recreate miniature settings of those once prevalent in the wild.

Yellow Flag IrisIris pseudacorus – Iris Felen

Origin: The British Isles

Flowering: June, July

A summer flowering plant, it charms anyone with its bright yellow flowers, a symbol of vitality. It is one of the only two Iris species native to Britain and has always enjoyed substantial popularity. It thrives in a range of damp environments from water saturated soils to pons sides or river banks – if the needed level of moisture is provided, it will naturalise well anywhere. It is as popular on mainland Britain as it is on its offshore territories, although it is more frequently found on the islands. Also, its average height ranges between 24 and 30 inches.

Golden Saxifrage - Chrysoplenium oppositifolium - Eglyn Cyferbynddaill

Origin: Britain

Flowering: March, April, May, June

Modest in size, this species spreads like wildfire and forms a ‘’carpet’’ of flowers and foliage over patches of very moist or even drenched soil. The small flowers chromatically blend with the green yet yellowish foliage, creating an effect of fresh, unspoilt vegetation in any area where it is planted. Blooming in early spring, it lasts through the season and into summer.

Bistort Persicaria bistorta superba – Llys y Neidr

Origin: Britain

Flowering: May, June

This plant, which generates lovely mauve blooms in late May, grows in a variety of natural backdrops such as damp meadows but also in mountainous regions. The plant is also believed to have certain properties related to female fertility and has long been used towards facilitating conception and birth.

Globe FlowerTrollius europaeus – Cronell

Origin: Northern Europe, Central Europe

Flowering: May, June

A small bog plant not exceeding three inches on average, this species is common in many parts of Europe and is believed to originate from the centre and north of the continent. A typical bog plant in terms of water requirements, it needs saturated soil in order to optimally develop. In spring, it generates eye-catching, bright yellow globe-shaped flowers which last into summer.

Pendulous SedgeCarex pendula – Hesgen DDibynnaidd

Origin: Britain

Flowering: May, June, July, August

Common throughout Britain (except for the north of Scotland) and the whole of Europe, this tall plant which produces beautiful flowery spikes can typically be found on riverbanks. Its rich foliage rustles in the wind in a characteristic manner and gently swings the stem. Its average height ranging between 3 and 4 feet (although in certain areas it is known to reach even 5) and its flowers are initially green, to later turn violet. Aside from stream and river banks it can also be seen in damp woodlands. Its soil preference leans toward areas rich in clay, and as to sunlight exposure, it is known to prefer the shade.

Great Pond SedgeCarex riparia – Hesgen Braff-dywysennog

Origin: Britain

Flowering: May, June

Also frequently encountered all over Europe, this variety is suitable for planting near any natural or artificial water feature, as well as in marshland. Reaching an average of three feet in height, it has rich dark green foliage.